Dogs

Timothy Blewitt Bed(Hons) MA Dog Sculptures

     My life was interrupted by having to work as a teacher of Art and Craft in various senior schools before retiring. Much of my career was in ceramics but later involved painting and crafts. I have exhibited both ceramics and art works in a variety of venues in past years. More recently and after a longish break I tried to analyze all the things I thought I was good at and draw them together to produce a work of art that I would really enjoy making. These skills involved, design, woodwork, sculpture, and the obsessive collecting of relevant materials. Dogs was the subject matter decided upon, not because of any particular love of dogs but because they suited so many of my criteria in terms of construction and unique ways of interpretation. Various breeds of dogs are all so different in size, shape, coat and character. 

     I have only made male dogs as they seem more anatomically more interesting. Also they need to be large dogs but not necessarily finished to be life size. As a rough guide they are all somewhat larger than life. Wherever possible I have based them upon 'known' dogs or fictional ones. A close friend and neighbour is an authority upon dogs and advises me upon their individual characters and temperament all of which I try to incorporate into the dogs. Each dog has a name relevant to it and has a meaning. In some cases I offer no explanation for this, it is up to the viewer to research it - although everyone of a certain age should know who 'Gnasher' is!

     The first dog, 'Troy' was a somewhat of an experiment but was successful enough to encourage me to make further dogs. Subsequent dog sculptures have become more sophisticated. All of my sculptures are for keeping indoors and would deteriorate if left permanently outside. Ideally they would be displayed on a plinth in a large area, perhaps the foyer in a commercial building.

     Each dog is unique and will not be repeated. The materials used have been carefully chosen to reflect the particular breed chosen and emphasize their characters. The basic structure is made from wood, mostly large roofing timbers nailed together in a box like construction and then carved out with a reticulating saw, chisels, sandpaper etc. Typically a finished piece may take around 300-400 hours and contain 10,000 nails. They are all on castors mainly to make it easier to move them around as each sculpture is very heavy, roughly 100kg or more. Each piece has been treated with various preservatives including Cuprinol 5*

            

        

     

Contact me - Tim Blewitt

Last updated 07/06/21

Previous Exhibitions

Nail Configurations